As a parent who shares custody or visitation rights with your child’s other parent, your ability to move with your child is often limited. Usually, parents agree in a written custody agreement that a parent cannot relocate. In the cases where a judge determined custody, there is typically a clause that bars relocation.

 

If You Are Trying to Relocate

If you are the parent trying to relocate, it is best to tell your ex and the court of your plans. Not doing so could be in violation of the custody order and could open you up to a contempt action or other consequences.

If you and your ex agree to the terms of the relocation, a new agreement can be created and signed. If you cannot agree, a court will hear your case and make a determination based on the best interests of the child.

 

If Your Ex Is the One Relocating

If your child’s other parent has relocated with the child or you believe relocation maybe be imminent, you have options. You should contact a skilled attorney right away.

Through your attorney, you can get a quick court date or an injunction to stop the relocation. If your ex has already moved, it may be possible to hold them in contempt in particularly serious cases.

Once the court has been made aware of the relocation, a new custody hearing can be held. The court will consider where your ex relocated to and the fact that he or she did so in violation of the court order.

 

Contact a Sugar Land, TX Child Relocation Attorney

In today’s world, moving is commonplace, especially following a divorce or breakdown of a relationship. However, if there is a custody agreement or order in place, special steps must be taken in order to adhere to its terms.

We understand that this can be a stressful time, especially if you are the parent trying to relocate. Having a skilled child custody attorney will make the process easier.
To schedule a consultation with a Texas child relocation attorney, call Frank J. Vendt today at 832-276-9474 or contact us online.

1 https://divorcelawyerintx.com/factors-court-will-consider-determining-best-interests-child/

2 https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/injunction